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Lake Sammamish State Park

Birding at Lake Sammamish
 
Birding at Lake Sammamish

Lake Sammamish State Park is a 512-acre day-use park with 6,858 feet of waterfront on Lake Sammamish in Issaquah. The park provides deciduous forest and wetland vegetation for the enjoyment of visitors, a large great blue heron rookery and the salmon-bearing Issaquah Creek. The park has one of the largest freshwater beaches in the greater Seattle area.

This urban park offers a wide assortment of birds and habitats in its varied ecosystems. Birds commonly seen include Crows, Pigeons, Waterfowl (Eurasian Wigeon, American Wigeon, Mallard, Bufflehead, Green-winged Teal, Ruddy Duck, Common Goldeneye, Hooded Merganser, Coots), Kinglets, Cedar Waxwings, various Sparrows, Geese, Gulls (Mew, Ring-billed, California, Herring and Glaucous-winged), Bald Eagles, Red-tailed and Sharp-shinned Hawks, Great Blue Heron, Jays, Owls, Wilson’s Snipe, and Woodpeckers.

Nature Walks for Beginning Birders

Join us each month for a 4-hour bird walk in this lovely park on the shores of Lake Sammamish. Check the Eastside Audubon Calendar for day and date. We meet at 8:00 a.m. and walk 2 to 3 miles.

Bring binoculars and meet in the south parking lot. We welcome beginning birders, families, and anyone who just wants to take a pleasant walk. Non-members are welcome (no charge) and pre-registration is not required.

Dress appropriately (rainproof in layers; some of the trails can be muddy if wet).

Directions: From I-90, take exit #15 (Issaquah), turn north, turn west (left) at the first stop light, and follow the signs. Just inside the main entrance, take the first left into the large parking lot and meet at the northeast end. A Discover Pass is required to park. Co-led by Sharon Aagaard and Stan Wood.

Call Sharon with any questions: 425-891-3460.

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The mission of Eastside Audubon is to protect, preserve and enhance natural ecosystems and our communities for the benefit of birds, other wildlife and people.